Lives of quiet desperation
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Lives of quiet desperation the ancestry of a Louisiana Frenchman by Gary M. Lavergne

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Published by Atex Austin in Austin, Tex. (4106 N. Lamar, Austin 78756) .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Louisiana

Subjects:

  • Lavergne family.,
  • Louisiana -- Genealogy.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes index.

StatementGary M. Lavergne.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsCS71.L4127195 1991
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 204 p. :
Number of Pages204
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1647382M
LC Control Number91204351

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One of Henry David Thoreau's most frequently quoted sayings is "The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation." Many people have cited this sentence to me. From Lives of Quiet Desperation by Gary M. Lavergne Louisiana's French heritage has been the subject of much prose and poetry. Since Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's epic poem "Evangeline" romanticized the Acadian Odyssey, numerous novels, works of historical fiction, histories, documentaries and motion pictures of the recent past tended to melt all French cultures into a generic "Cajun" culture.   The longer version is “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation. What is called resignation is confirmed desperation.” In the book, the desperation is one of meaning and relevance. The book describes how people are locked into a framework of human creation, working to serve the interests of others.   The quote by David Thoreau, “Most men live lives of quiet desperation,” seems to be true and likely explains why there has so far not been an effective counter-revolution to try and stop the ongoing white genocide and destruction of Western European civilization.

Henry David Thoreau famously stated in Walden that “the mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.” He thinks misplaced value is the cause: We feel a void in our lives, and we attempt to fill it with things like money, possessions, and accolades.   A life of quiet desperation can feature, among other things, a frustrated desire to communicate one's beliefs as to what will contribute to the "good of all," which is, unfortunately, lacking.   While Henry David Thoreau is often credited with variations of the aphorism “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and die with their song still inside them,” that is not what he wrote in.   Most men live lives of quiet desperation. The aphorism is a paraphrase of what Henry David Thoreau famously wrote in Walden (the actual quote begins “The mass of men live lives ”). Anyone with even a pretty cursory understanding of Thoreau’s life and philosophy knows that such a hedonistic, materialistic, jet-setting lifestyle isn’t exactly what he had in mind with that : Brett And Kate Mckay.

  Sometimes I think of Henry David Thoreau’s quote “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them.” I wonder what he meant. Was it the modern definition of a dream unfulfilled or the tragic notion that one never really understand themselves until . Here is the correct quotation: “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation. What is called resignation is confirmed desperation. From the desperate city you go into the desperate country, and have to console yourself with the bravery of minks and muskrats.   The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation. What is called resignation is confirmed desperation. From the desperate city you go into the desperate country, and have to console yourself with the bravery of minks and muskrats. A stereotyped but unconscious despair is concealed even under what are called the games and amusements of mankind. From Lives of Quiet Desperation by Gary M. Lavergne Shortly after the French founded Quebec in , their explorers and fur traders pushed westward along the Great Lakes area. The chief activity of the French was the fur trade conducted by the coureurs de bois or the "runners of the woods.".